Untitled
good:

With the joy of Carmageddon behind us (tell us how you celebrated!), it’s time to start thinking about the future. A future which, in Los Angeles, will hopefully include some better transit options. But L.A., as we all know, was built for cars, from the country’s first freeway to the extra-wide side streets. To move this city forward, we first have to consider what Los Angeles would be like with fewer cars. We’re partnering with Rethink LA: Perspectives on a Future City, an exhibition which opens at the A+D Museum in August, to imagine the city when it has moved beyond cars.
Illustration by Lorin Brown
See how to submit on GOOD→

good:

With the joy of Carmageddon behind us (tell us how you celebrated!), it’s time to start thinking about the future. A future which, in Los Angeles, will hopefully include some better transit options. But L.A., as we all know, was built for cars, from the country’s first freeway to the extra-wide side streets. To move this city forward, we first have to consider what Los Angeles would be like with fewer cars. We’re partnering with Rethink LA: Perspectives on a Future City, an exhibition which opens at the A+D Museum in August, to imagine the city when it has moved beyond cars.

Illustration by Lorin Brown

See how to submit on GOOD→

good:

With the joy of Carmageddon behind us (tell us how you celebrated!), it’s time to start thinking about the future. A future which, in Los Angeles, will hopefully include some better transit options. But L.A., as we all know, was built for cars, from the country’s first freeway to the extra-wide side streets. To move this city forward, we first have to consider what Los Angeles would be like with fewer cars. We’re partnering with Rethink LA: Perspectives on a Future City, an exhibition which opens at the A+D Museum in August, to imagine the city when it has moved beyond cars.
Illustration by Lorin Brown
See how to submit on GOOD→

good:

With the joy of Carmageddon behind us (tell us how you celebrated!), it’s time to start thinking about the future. A future which, in Los Angeles, will hopefully include some better transit options. But L.A., as we all know, was built for cars, from the country’s first freeway to the extra-wide side streets. To move this city forward, we first have to consider what Los Angeles would be like with fewer cars. We’re partnering with Rethink LA: Perspectives on a Future City, an exhibition which opens at the A+D Museum in August, to imagine the city when it has moved beyond cars.

Illustration by Lorin Brown

See how to submit on GOOD→

ofanotherfashion:

image

The Daily News titled this photograph “Mexican American Female Gang” when it ran the photo in 1942 but the systematic criminalization of Mexicans in the 1940s as a justification for racially-motivated attacks (especially directed at zoot suiters) makes me a little wary of the title. In any…

motherjones:

Venn Diagram: Rape vs. Flat Tire
Following up on our last post, MJ’s Jen Phillips threw this together. You know, just in case Kansas GOP Rep. Pete DeGraaf would like to understand the differences between getting pregnant from rape and busting a flat on the side of the road.

motherjones:

Venn Diagram: Rape vs. Flat Tire

Following up on our last post, MJ’s Jen Phillips threw this together. You know, just in case Kansas GOP Rep. Pete DeGraaf would like to understand the differences between getting pregnant from rape and busting a flat on the side of the road.

nationalpost:

Marmaduke sure gets along with those chicks, 30 of them in factA British Columbia dog has become a mother hen after adopting a flock of 30 chicks. Sue Paull, owner of Eco Turf Farms in Kelowna, B.C., said that when the weather forced her to incubate 30 chicks inside, the family’s 16-month-old Great Dane kept watch over the eggs and began licking the hatchlings.Now, fully bonded with the baby chicks, Marmaduke oversees their activities, keeps a close eye on anyone who dares pick one up, and even sleeps next to them. “When the chicks were hatching, there was a window in front of the incubator.He watched them all hatch and he was so curious. When we put them in the box, he just took one out and started cleaning them,” said Ms. Paull. “Every time you go near the box, he has to be there. (Photo: Sue Paull/Eco Turf Farms)

nationalpost:

Marmaduke sure gets along with those chicks, 30 of them in fact
A British Columbia dog has become a mother hen after adopting a flock of 30 chicks. Sue Paull, owner of Eco Turf Farms in Kelowna, B.C., said that when the weather forced her to incubate 30 chicks inside, the family’s 16-month-old Great Dane kept watch over the eggs and began licking the hatchlings.

Now, fully bonded with the baby chicks, Marmaduke oversees their activities, keeps a close eye on anyone who dares pick one up, and even sleeps next to them. “When the chicks were hatching, there was a window in front of the incubator.

He watched them all hatch and he was so curious. When we put them in the box, he just took one out and started cleaning them,” said Ms. Paull. “Every time you go near the box, he has to be there. (Photo: Sue Paull/Eco Turf Farms)

good:

Man, Long Beach is nailing it right now.
latimes:

The spirit of sharing is growing at Long Beach Community Garden. Jeff Spurrier reports:

At Long Beach Community Garden, known for its stunningly high yields, all gardeners dedicate 10% of their harvest to one of five local charitable organizations. (Other community gardens also donate to food banks, but at Long Beach the giving seems to be on an entirely different level.) The biggest recipient is the Long Beach Rescue Mission, which provides three meals a day to 250 people.

Photo credit: Ann Summa

good:

Man, Long Beach is nailing it right now.

latimes:

The spirit of sharing is growing at Long Beach Community Garden. Jeff Spurrier reports:

At Long Beach Community Garden, known for its stunningly high yields, all gardeners dedicate 10% of their harvest to one of five local charitable organizations. (Other community gardens also donate to food banks, but at Long Beach the giving seems to be on an entirely different level.) The biggest recipient is the Long Beach Rescue Mission, which provides three meals a day to 250 people.

Photo credit: Ann Summa

youzlookinfine:

Amanda came out looking like Brad Renfro’s (living) understudy. Decided this jam was going straight to my trapper-keeper.

youzlookinfine:

Amanda came out looking like Brad Renfro’s (living) understudy. Decided this jam was going straight to my trapper-keeper.

good:

Reporter Mac McClelland writes a haunting piece for us on her personal struggle with PTSD: 

It was my research editor who told me it was completely nuts to willingly get fucked at gunpoint. That’s what she called me when I told her the story. We were drunk and in a karaoke bar, so at the time I came up with only a wounded face and a whiny, “I’m not completely nuuuuts!” Upon further consideration, a more explanative response probably would have been something like: Well. You had to be there.
“There” would be Haiti, where I’d just spent two weeks covering the one-year anniversary of the earthquake that shook the country into ugly chaos. There, a local regular at my hotel restaurant who is not accustomed to taking no for an answer had gotten desperate. After proposing for the 87th time that I have intercourse with him, he was grasping for anything that might change my mind, trying eventually, wildly, “We can do this at gunpoint if that sells it for you.” And actually, it did, yeah.
There are a lot of guns in Haiti. Guns on security guards in front of banks and gas stations. Guns on kidnappers who make a living snatching rich people, guns on rich people who are afraid of kidnappers. Guns on the gang-raping monsters who prowl the flimsy encampments of the earthquake homeless. Guns in the hands of the 12,000 United Nations peacekeepers, who sometimes draw them too quickly in civilians’ faces and always sling them carelessly across their laps in the back of UN trucks, barrels pointed inadvertently at your face while you drive behind them in traffic. On that reporting trip, I’d been fantasizing about precisely what the local guy proposed, my back against a wall or a mattress with a friendly gun to my throat. But the plan was vetoed about as soon as it was hatched, when I asked him if his firearm had a safety and he said no. Like I say: I am not completely nuts.

Read more on GOOD → 
How Violent Sex Helped Ease My PTSD - Media - GOOD

good:

Reporter Mac McClelland writes a haunting piece for us on her personal struggle with PTSD: 

It was my research editor who told me it was completely nuts to willingly get fucked at gunpoint. That’s what she called me when I told her the story. We were drunk and in a karaoke bar, so at the time I came up with only a wounded face and a whiny, “I’m not completely nuuuuts!” Upon further consideration, a more explanative response probably would have been something like: Well. You had to be there.

“There” would be Haiti, where I’d just spent two weeks covering the one-year anniversary of the earthquake that shook the country into ugly chaos. There, a local regular at my hotel restaurant who is not accustomed to taking no for an answer had gotten desperate. After proposing for the 87th time that I have intercourse with him, he was grasping for anything that might change my mind, trying eventually, wildly, “We can do this at gunpoint if that sells it for you.” And actually, it did, yeah.

There are a lot of guns in Haiti. Guns on security guards in front of banks and gas stations. Guns on kidnappers who make a living snatching rich people, guns on rich people who are afraid of kidnappers. Guns on the gang-raping monsters who prowl the flimsy encampments of the earthquake homeless. Guns in the hands of the 12,000 United Nations peacekeepers, who sometimes draw them too quickly in civilians’ faces and always sling them carelessly across their laps in the back of UN trucks, barrels pointed inadvertently at your face while you drive behind them in traffic. On that reporting trip, I’d been fantasizing about precisely what the local guy proposed, my back against a wall or a mattress with a friendly gun to my throat. But the plan was vetoed about as soon as it was hatched, when I asked him if his firearm had a safety and he said no. Like I say: I am not completely nuts.

Read more on GOOD → 

How Violent Sex Helped Ease My PTSD - Media - GOOD

nationalpost:

Photo gallery: Hat tricks at the Royal Ascot It’s Royal Ascot week in the U.K. The races, which continue until June 18, are a British tradition, mixing sport, style and pageantry. According to us, it’s a week for looking at eccentric hats. (Photo: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)

nationalpost:

Photo gallery: Hat tricks at the Royal Ascot
It’s Royal Ascot week in the U.K. The races, which continue until June 18, are a British tradition, mixing sport, style and pageantry. According to us, it’s a week for looking at eccentric hats. (Photo: Carl de Souza/AFP/Getty Images)